Blog

Author: 

greenduck

Houseplant for the month of February 2015: Primulas are known as fun, colourful winter and spring plants for indoors and outdoors. Primula is also a diminutive of the word Primus and means ‘first’. The plant is therefore perfect to herald the spring.

Tulips
© BBH

Author: 

greenduck

Tulips originate from Iran, Afghanistan and Kazakhstan. The flower travelled through Turkey to the Netherlands, the country with which the flower is particularly associated with nowadays. The tulip mania of the 16th century (when a tulip bulb was worth as much as a canal-side house in Amsterdam) may have passed, but many people still gain instant pleasure from this flower. This is undoubtedly linked to the spring fever that tulips evoke.

Winterschutz
© BdB

Author: 

greenduck

Delicate herbs and potted plants need special winter protection measures

Amaryllis
© BBH

Author: 

greenduck

The amaryllis, also known as Hippeastrum, originates from South and Central America and the Caribbean. The name amaryllis comes from the Greek ‘amarussein’, which means ‘sparkling’ or ‘shining’. The flower is a member of the Narcissus family and grows from a bulb.

garden pond
© FLH

Author: 

greenduck

Because they are cold-blooded animals, the body temperature of fish and amphibians decreases with the water temperature in the garden pond, as does their agility.

Flower Bulbs
© BGL

Author: 

greenduck

Flowering bulbs can be planted out as long as the ground remains unfrozen. Those who put crocuses, narcissuses, tulips, etc.

© greenduck

Author: 

greenduck

Frost, cold wind and winter sun are putting the roses in a lot of distress. Therefore, they need to be protected and well wrapped.

Oleander
© tokamuwi / pixelio

Author: 

greenduck

Now an uncomfortable time begins for southern container plants. They tolerate no or only light frost and should be brought to its winter quarters in time.

Canna
© Petra Hegewald / pixelio

Author: 

greenduck

Latest after the first frost, the tubers (bulbs) of Canna need to come of the ground so they have a chance to survive the winter. Cut the green six inches above the ground and dig out the rhizomes (rootstock).

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs