Cutflowers

Gerbera
© BBH

Author: 

greenduck

The power of the gerbera? That is without doubt its fresh colour and playful shape. With gerberas, you bring a large dose of happiness into your home.

Tulips
© BBH

Author: 

greenduck

Tulips originate from Iran, Afghanistan and Kazakhstan. The flower travelled through Turkey to the Netherlands, the country with which the flower is particularly associated with nowadays. The tulip mania of the 16th century (when a tulip bulb was worth as much as a canal-side house in Amsterdam) may have passed, but many people still gain instant pleasure from this flower. This is undoubtedly linked to the spring fever that tulips evoke.

Amaryllis
© BBH

Author: 

greenduck

The amaryllis, also known as Hippeastrum, originates from South and Central America and the Caribbean. The name amaryllis comes from the Greek ‘amarussein’, which means ‘sparkling’ or ‘shining’. The flower is a member of the Narcissus family and grows from a bulb.

Peony
© FCH

Author: 

greenduck

The abundant peony is a harbinger of summer. The peony is a real farm flower and is often found in farm gardens. She comes from China and was not only grown for their beauty but most of all for the fever-reducing and haemostatic effect of the roots. The botanical name Paeonia comes from the Greek word Paion: physician of the Greek gods. The peony in your home is only suitable to put in a vase and not for medicinal use.

Submitted by
Messe Essen

According to Eurostat, the imports of cut flowers into the EU have risen in the first half of 2012 compared with the same period in the previous year.
The largest importer of cut flowers, the Netherlands, has raised its import values from South America and Africa by approx. 10 %.
Furthermore, the direct imports by Germany have increased by 10 % in the first half of 2012, primarily from the African countries Kenya and Ethiopia.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Cutflowers