Garden Design

Acer palmatum
© GMH/GBV
Submitted by
greenduck

Trees and shrubs delight us with a beautiful fall color at the end of the season. When the days get shorter and the abundance of flowers of summer gradually fades, it is time for the trees and shrubs: in spring they delighted us with their fresh green, later were an attractive backdrop for perennials and summer flowers and donated shade on hot days, but now put their leaves in focus in a spectacular fashion.

Rosa, Carex, Heuchera, Oxalis
© Floradania
Submitted by
greenduck

Even the late summer brings many happy hours. Now depleted summer flowers are replaced with autumn flowering bulbs which once again conjure new color impressions on balcony and terrace. Late summer days invite us to plant. The sooner the plants get into the ground, the better they will be rooted and delight us well into December. Many varieties then restart in the spring.

Helleborus / Christmas Rose
© BBH
Submitted by
greenduck

When most garden plants are hibernating, the Christmas Rose with its dark green foliage and radiant flowers provides colour in the winter garden. Purple, white, pink, pale yellow, black or spotted, Christmas roses are the must-haves this winter. Give them a place in the border or fill a couple of baskets.

Englisch Heather
© GMH
Submitted by
greenduck

Flowers in winter are seldom in the garden. English heather is the exception here. From October through April the blooms show their colors – red violet, pink, and white. While other plants blossom in spring and summer, its evergreen leaves cover the ground and make a reliably green background.

Lavender, Allium
© Kurz/Downderry
Submitted by
greenduck

Combine Allium with Lavendel for an unexpected and striking contrast. Allium, with its large ball-flowers and sturdy stems, is one of the most imposing onion blooms. Its spherical umbels can be very large, like on Allium 'Globemaster.' 



Climbing Roses
© BGL
Submitted by
greenduck

Fairytale images appear before our eyes in summer when blooming roses surround archways and doorways, forming a frame of flowers around windows and doors. The term “climbing rose” is actually a bit misleading, since the classic types can't climb up walls on their own like ivy or wild grapes do. Roses need support. To give your roses footing, they need a pergola or an espalier.

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