Blooming Wonders - Hydrangea

Hydrangea
© CFalk / pixelio

Modern hydrangeas are truly multitalented. They blossom in glorious globes on balconies and terraces, their abundant slender stalks captures the eye's attention, and they combine well with other flower bed plants.

Two Varieties of Bigleaf Hydrangea

The most well known variety is the bigleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla). They come in two varieties of inflorescence: as a full ball and as a flat plane, in which inconspicuous flowers located in the middle are surrounded by a decorative wreath of petals. They bloom for a long time, are tolerant to change, and make a wonderful gift for any occasion.

Country Charm and Pastels

Adverse to pastel tones? Don't immediately dismiss them. White, pink, and light blue make for a romantic garden. Planted in a basket or wooden barrel, their country charm spills over onto terrace and balcony. If you prefer brighter colors, the new, stronger colors are just right. Bright red, powerful pink, as well as purple come in various shades and give hydrangeas a fresh face. Artistic pots suited for flowers make the blossoms look young and modern.

Designers Favor Green Umbels

Hydrangeas with umbels in two colors lend a certain charm. Combinations of light purple petals and dark purple edges or blue blossoms with a white edge are just some of the possibilities.
If you're presenting a potted plant as a gift, a discreet container is recommended. Hydrangeas with intense green buds that open up into green-white umbels are a designer favorite. You can highlight their effect by placing them in a metal pot or one of artificial stone.

Deadheading

Growth and development of new buds can be supported by removing spent blossoms. Gardeners recommend using your fingers to carefully remove the inflorescence above the leaves by snapping it to the side. Research has shown that hydrangeas react with increased growth more quickly to deadheading than they do when the flowers are cut. Cutting back varieties that bloom several times is recommended in spring after the last frost.

Submitted by: 
greenduck

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