Outdoor

Liquidambar
© greenduck.com
Submitted by
greenduck

Our tip for cultivating a richly colored late fall with woody plants: the Liquidambar or sweet gum tree. It’s one of the last to lose its leaves as the year wanes. It’s almost as if it doesn’t want to give up the green gown that budded late in spring and now, in fall, gleams with glorious colors.

Fall leaves
© w.r.wagner / pixelio

Author: 

greenduck

If you throw away the autumn leaves from the garden, many nutrients lost for the natural cycle of growth and decay get lost. The dead leaves of trees and shrubs are a very valuable part of the compost and supplement other green waste.

Goldfish
© FLH

Author: 

greenduck

What many don’t know: Even fish can perceive sounds. The ancient Chinese took advantage of the hearing of their goldfish and called the animals with a bell to the pond’s edge at feeding time.

Heath
© Thomas Max Müller / pixelio

Author: 

greenduck

Heath offers an enormous richness of color and many variants for fall and winter. She loves open and exposed spots and can never get too much sun. Heath grows best in moist, well-drained, acidic soil.

Roses
© BdB
Submitted by
greenduck

These days, garden roses come in an extensive variety of forms and colors, including pure blue and black. The blossoms can be single or clustered into different formations. According to their intended use, a suitable rose can be found for your garden. Growers distinguish between tea roses (tea hybrids), bedding roses (polyantha roses), ground-covering roses, and climbing or rambling roses. Today there are more than 30,000 known rose varieties … and, every year, new are added. Growers endeavor to develop new colors, fragrances, and forms, but there are also ongoing attempts to improve flower health and resistance to typical diseases such as mildew.



Climbing plants
© BGL
Submitted by
greenduck

Many city dwellers dream of their own garden, a cultivated retreat where they can escape the crowds, noise, and stress — even if it’s only a balcony, rooftop terrace, or courtyard. Climbing plants are particularly well suited to creating a green oasis in a small space. They nestle right up to bare walls, fences, or railings and quickly transform brick and concrete into a green room full of life.

© BGL
Submitted by
greenduck

Summer vacation offers sun and the promise of good weather. For most people summer vacation is just a few short weeks of relaxation before the daily grind starts up again. But if you have a garden or balcony, you can feel like you're on vacation even after coming home from a day at work. Best of all, you don't even have to bother with the hassle of travel to feel like you're away.

gardening with childrenn
© S. Hofschläger / pixelio
Submitted by
greenduck

Children can learn so much from experiences in the garden. If you've ever climbed trees as a child yourself and played between branches and canopy, you probably recall the memory fondly. Playing in the garden isn't just a way for children to have fun, it's also a way for them to learn about the world of plants. A child-friendly garden should be more than just a playground. Children can learn how to identify plants by touching them and experimenting with them. Beginning in kindergarden, children can shed their shyness by connecting with the natural world and can soon learn to identify and name different plants and animals.

Dachbegrünung
© BGL
Submitted by
greenduck

Buildings with green rooftops return a bit of nature to an urban setting, thereby improving microclimates and reducing small particulate pollution. Green rooves are also lends excellent sound and temperature insulation to a home. Inhabitants can enjoy a reduction in their heating bill during the colder months and, in summer, the shade and evaporation effect of a green roof provides a noticeable cooling effect for the building.

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