lavender

Roses, Hydrangea, Margerites
© Floradania
Submitted by
greenduck

While many people think of potted plants as something you have on a window-sill, garden expert Claus Dalby talks about how he uses potted plants outdoors, and combines them to create small still life tableaux.

Lavender, Allium
© Kurz/Downderry
Submitted by
greenduck

Combine Allium with Lavendel for an unexpected and striking contrast. Allium, with its large ball-flowers and sturdy stems, is one of the most imposing onion blooms. Its spherical umbels can be very large, like on Allium 'Globemaster.' 



Lavender
© GMH/Peter Behrens

Author: 

greenduck

Lavender is truly an easy-care plant, but you still need to find the right location for it in your yard: one that’s sunny and protected from the wind, if possible – this last part is particularly important for s

Lavender
© BBH
Submitted by
greenduck


The spicy, aromatic aroma and violet flowers of lavender can transform every garden into a bewitching oasis of wellbeing. For all that, it’s also a very humble garden inhabitant that doesn’t require much care.

Lavender
© GPP / Downderry
Submitted by
greenduck

Container gardens are mobile and can be creatively arranged, a different combination every time. Many plants thrive mightily in containers and bring flair to the balcony or patio that lends a Mediterranean feel. Due to their usually small volumes, plants that grow in pots dry out more rapidly and won’t necessarily make it through a hot, waterless weekend. Lavender much prefers dry to moist, relatively poor soil to rich, and is therefore ideal for balcony and terrace owners who don’t want to ply the watering can daily.



Lavendula
© GPP / Downderry
Submitted by
greenduck

We love true lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) most of all because of its intoxicating scent. If you've got lavender in your garden or on your balcony, you can enjoy more than just its beauty and scent. The plant is also great as a culinary herb. Try it for yourself!

Downderry Lavendula
© GPP
Submitted by
greenduck

Everyone knows the pictures of the blue fields of lavender from the bucolic French Provence. But lavender doesn’t only blossom in blue; it can also be violet, light pink, light blue, and bright white. Flower shape and plant form vary as well. Besides that, lavender doesn’t just grow in the Mediterranean region; it can also be successfully grown in northern regions. So that their kings and queens could drink lavender tea and enjoy the scented soaps and oils they produced, official court gardeners introduced lavender to English castle gardens centuries ago.

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